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ROGERS Alan

  • Rogers Lab, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, United States of America
  • Evolutionary Biology, Genetics and population Genetics
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1982 PhD, University of New Mexico 1982-1983 Software developer, Robotics Lab, Carnegie Mellon University 1983-1986 Assistant professor, SUNY-Albany 1986-1988 Research assistant professor, University of Pittsburgh 1988-present Faculty (Asst Prof, then Assoc Prof, then Prof) University of Utah

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19 Sep 2022
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HMMploidy: inference of ploidy levels from short-read sequencing data

Detecting variation in ploidy within and between genomes

Recommended by based on reviews by Barbara Holland, Benjamin Peter and Nicolas Galtier

Soraggi et al. [2] describe HMMploidy, a statistical method that takes DNA sequencing data as input and uses a hidden Markov model to estimate ploidy. The method allows ploidy to vary not only between individuals, but also between and even within chromosomes. This allows the method to detect aneuploidy and also chromosomal regions in which multiple paralogous loci have been mistakenly assembled on top of one another. 

HMMploidy estimates genotypes and ploidy simultaneously, with a separate estimate for each genome. The genome is divided into a series of non-overlapping windows (typically 100), and HMMploidy provides a separate estimate of ploidy within each window of each genome. The method is thus estimating a large number of parameters, and one might assume that this would reduce its accuracy. However, it benefits from large samples of genomes. Large samples increase the accuracy of internal allele frequency estimates, and this improves the accuracy of genotype and ploidy estimates. In large samples of low-coverage genomes, HMMploidy outperforms all other estimators. It does not require a reference genome of known ploidy. The power of the method increases with coverage and sample size but decreases with ploidy. Consequently, high coverage or large samples may be needed if ploidy is high. 

The method is slower than some alternative methods, but run time is not excessive. Run time increases with number of windows but isn't otherwise affected by genome size. It should be feasible even with large genomes, provided that the number of windows is not too large. The authors apply their method and several alternatives to isolates of a pathogenic yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans, obtained from HIV-infected patients. With these data, HMMploidy replicated previous findings of polyploidy and aneuploidy. There were several surprises. For example, HMMploidy estimates the same ploidy in two isolates taken on different days from a single patient, even though sequencing coverage was three times as high on the later day as on the earlier one. These findings were replicated in data that were down-sampled to mimic low coverage. 

Three alternative methods (ploidyNGS [1], nQuire, and nQuire.Den [3]) estimated the highest ploidy considered in all samples from each patient. The present authors suggest that these results are artifactual and reflect the wide variation in allele frequencies. Because of this variation, these methods seem to have preferred the model with the largest number of parameters. HMMploidy represents a new and potentially useful tool for studying variation in ploidy. It will be of most use in studying the genetics of asexual organisms and cancers, where aneuploidy imposes little or no penalty on reproduction. It should also be useful for detecting assembly errors in de novo genome sequences from non-model organisms.

References

[1] Augusto Corrêa dos Santos R, Goldman GH, Riaño-Pachón DM (2017) ploidyNGS: visually exploring ploidy with Next Generation Sequencing data. Bioinformatics, 33, 2575–2576. https://doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btx204

[2] Soraggi S, Rhodes J, Altinkaya I, Tarrant O, Balloux F, Fisher MC, Fumagalli M (2022) HMMploidy: inference of ploidy levels from short-read sequencing data. bioRxiv, 2021.06.29.450340, ver. 6 peer-reviewed and recommended by Peer Community in Mathematical and Computational Biology. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.06.29.450340

[3] Weiß CL, Pais M, Cano LM, Kamoun S, Burbano HA (2018) nQuire: a statistical framework for ploidy estimation using next generation sequencing. BMC Bioinformatics, 19, 122. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12859-018-2128-z

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ROGERS Alan

  • Rogers Lab, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, United States of America
  • Evolutionary Biology, Genetics and population Genetics
  • recommender

Recommendation:  1

Reviews:  0

Areas of expertise
1982 PhD, University of New Mexico 1982-1983 Software developer, Robotics Lab, Carnegie Mellon University 1983-1986 Assistant professor, SUNY-Albany 1986-1988 Research assistant professor, University of Pittsburgh 1988-present Faculty (Asst Prof, then Assoc Prof, then Prof) University of Utah